SOLLIMS Sampler Volume 1 Issue 2- Rule of Law

SOLLIMS Sampler Volume 1 Issue 2- Rule of Law is the second release of a SOLLIMS Sampler and the focus is on RoL and legitimacy in governance. This lessons-learned compendium contains just a sample – thus the title of “sampler” – of the observations, insights, and lessons related to the protection of civilians in conflict environments available in the JKO data repository transferred from the former SOLLIMS database. These observations are worth sharing with military commanders and their staffs, as well as civilian practitioners with a Stability Operations-related mission / function – those currently deployed into conflict environments, those planning to deploy, the institutional Army, policy makers and other international civilian and military leaders at the national and theater level.

Harnessing Post Conflict Transitions: A Conceptual Primer

This monograph Harnessing Post Conflict Transitions: A Conceptual Primer addresses the challenging topic of transition in post-conflict stability operations and is intended for a wide audience that includes military and civilian policymakers, international development experts, and scholars in academe. It is a primer, systematic review, and comprehensive assessment of the fields of research and practice.

U.S. Military Forces and Police Assistance in Stability Operations: The Least-Worst Option to Fill the U.S. Capacity Gap

The establishment of an effective police force is critical to security sector reform, justice sector reform, and the successful transition to the host nation’s security forces. But the United States lacks the institutional capacity to provide an immediate and coordinated civilian police training and advisory effort, particularly in a failed or fragile state.

Summary of Observations & Recommendations Concerning Security Sector Reform

Much can be gained through a “combined approach” to partnership in Stability Operations. In Afghanistan, the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) and the
Host Nation Security Force have recently taken such a combined approach to their partnership. Their new combined partnership is essentially an “embedded” partnership – where forces and personnel are “embedded” through co-location. An “embedded’ partnership facilitates development of a common operating picture (COP), allows fully integrated operations, and improves effectiveness of the team – from planning through execution. Additionally, when the activities of the “embedded” partnership are synchronized with other civil component efforts – especially at the local level – greater efficiencies are gained toward building capacity and achieving stability.

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SOLLMS Sampler Volume 1 Issue 1- Protection of Civilians in Peacekeeping Operations

This lessons-learned compendium contains just a sample – thus the title of “sampler” – of the observations, insights, and lessons related to the protection of civilians in conflict environments from the former SOLLIMS data repository. All data from SOLLIMS has been transitioned to JKO. These observations are worth sharing with military commanders and their staffs, as well as civilian practitioners with a Stability Operations-related mission / function – those currently deployed into conflict environments, those planning to deploy, the institutional Army, policy makers and other international civilian and military leaders at the national and theater level.

The State-Owned Enterprise as a Vehicle for Stability

As providers of essential public or commercial services, state-owned enterprises (SOEs) are important in modern economies. Since SOEs are ubiquitous in the global economy, they are likely to be present in conflict-prone societies. In such environments, the defining political and economic systems within which the SOEs exist are likely to embody the interests both of participants in the conflict and of those hoping for an end to the conflict.

Security Sector Reform: A Case Study Approach to Transition and Capacity Building

In this paper Security Sector Reform: A Case Study Approach to Transition and Capacity Building, the authors explore the definition of SSR as it has emerged in the international community, including the United States, its bilateral partners, and various intergovernmental organizations. It examines the makeup of the security sector, identifies emergent principles for implementing SSR in the community of practice, and specifies the outcomes that SSR is designed to produce.

A Case Study in Security Sector Reform: Learning from Security Sector Reform/Building in Afghanistan (October 2002-September 2003)

Foreword by General Stanley A. McChrystal

This PKSOI Paper A Case Study in Security Sector Reform: Learning from Security Sector Reform/Building in Afghanistan (October 2002-September 2003) is designed to further the U.S. and other interested international governments’ understanding of how Security Sector Reform (SSR) was conducted in Afghanistan from 2002 to 2003. This was America’s first attempt at conducting formalized SSR, so it offers readers an opportunity to learn whom the United States saw as key actors in the process, what institutions were slated for reform, and how well the United States and its partners met the typical challenges of SSR.

Toward a Risk Management Defense Strategy

This monograph Toward a Risk Management Defense Strategy builds on two previous works by the author—Known Unknowns: Unconventional “Strategic Shocks” in Defense Strategy Development and The New Balance: Limited Armed Stabilization and the Future of U.S. Landpower. It frames the contemporary defense decision making environment. It describes the concept of risk management as a founding principle for contemporary defense strategy development.